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of south africa, black and white, would go to the polls in if first democratic election in that country, and elect mandela their president with 62% of the vote. mandela set about what to do what seemed to be an impossible task, stitching together these two people, one oppressed, degraded for years, the other a minority, fearing they would be completely disempowered. in his inaugural speech, mandela stressed it would not be that way. >> and i enter a covenant to build a society in which all south africans, both black and white, will be able to walk tall without any fear in their hearts. a rainbow nation at peace with itself and the world. >> mandela would transfer power after a five-year term and live to become the founder of a new nation, the living embodiment of its highest aspirations. joining me now is rohid. i cannot imagine the mood in south africa at this moment. >> it's a strange mood and it's very early in the morning here. so it's difficult to gauge the mood across the country. but what i can say outside the home of nelson mandela in the suburbs of johannesburg is this huge cro
with my wife in westminster hall when he addressed both houses of our parliament as the democratically-elected president of all south africans. and i know i speak on behalf of the people in my constituency, holborn and st. pancras because they have a very special relationship with the anti-apartheid movement. the movement was founded at a meeting of about 60 people in the holborn halls in the summer of 959. 1959. its first leaflets were distributed a fortnight later outside camden town tube station. and its headquarters were always located in our area. it always had our support. so local people were particularly delighted when mr. mandela came to camden town in july 2003 to unveil a blue plaque this memory of ruth first who was murdered by the south african secret police and joe slovo who was a member of president mandela's first cabinet, and i'm delighted to see here observing us today his daughter, gillian. over many years committed people be in britain campaigned against apartheid, against the trials of the leaders of the african national congress and against the imprisonment that followed.
leadership to all of our elected officials to marry lee and, of course, to marry willingly i didn't brown. let me just thank you ail for helping you tell to getting get to this day. i want to thank the contractors and architects and manufactur manufacturesers. thank you for your long hours and hard work in the face of big challenges and those have been some major challenges that are paying off today. so give everyone who had a hand in this a big thank you. we must always honor the memory of folks who lost their lives in the earthquake. the contribution of this bridge first it's a beautiful structure f that adds another iconic structure to our incredible bay area landscape. it's truly a gateway to the east bay community. second this bridge it insures our safety. we all remember the distribution brought by the earthquake. we know the daggers of a future quake that's why it's so for this is built to withstand a big quake. we will right lane on this bridge to maintain the resources in the case of a man made disagrees. third this has big impacts on our economy. it will prove the transportation
there was no brady bill. it took another election. the election of 1992, in which sarah brady, a life-long republican, the daughter of that fbi agent, she supported the democrat, bill clinton. she supported him because he supported the brady bill. and in the fall of clinton's first year in office, with clinton's party in control of the house and of the senate, it actually happened. >> in the east room of the white house today, it was not just an ordinary presidential ceremony, the end of a long road for jim and sarah brady, parents of the brady bill. >> that was a road more than 12 years long. but at last gun control supporters could smile. the brady bill was now law. >> and now we're here to tell the nra that their nightmare is true, we're back. we're not going away after brady. we have a lot to do. >> chuck schumer, a much younger congressman chuck schumer back then and wasn't entirely wrong when he said that. congress did pass and clinton did sign an assault weapons ban months later. when they lost in a landslide in the 1994 midterms, many democrats blamed their gun activism for it. they did so ag
mandela had been elected president the night before, and i had the honor of being the first western journalist that day to shake his hand and sit down and talk with him. mandela showed no bitterness or anger. he was famous for that. no thought of revenge when i asked him about his predecessor f.w. de klerk, he spoke only of reconciliation and working together. >> our relations with mr. de klerk are fairly good. and he is one of those republicans i hold in high regard. we have had some differences. we have quarreled. we have said cruel things against each other. but at the end of the day, we are able to shake hands and think of the interest of south africa. and he has had that experience which i have not had. and if my organization comes out with majority in the elections, i will have to depend very much on his support, his experience. >> what happens when nelson mandela has to use force against elements of south africa's black community? are you willing and able to take on the political pressures that will take place? >> i don't expect a government -- as well as governments would re
and the new bridge. we're in oakland and it's fitting and a proper the first elected official is the chief of oakland. jean acquainting is one of my bosses so i'm sure her remarks will be excellent (clapping) >> and so welcome to oakland. (clapping). >> you know when i became mayor, i said oakland is a city of dreams. it's been the city of dreams since the trans conditional railroad ended and thousand of cabinets would arrive every week. it's become the city of dreams base it's the place that immigrants can afford to live and one-hundred plus languages are spoken here. in many ways this bridge was a dream of some people. and like most things in oakland it has not been easy. we have very difficult political and economic and other hurdles h that when we ail come tooth are not the results beautiful. isn't it really beautiful? so he texted the other mayor of oakland governor brown today and said we're sorry you're not here. for many of you who follow the fights he said he had an elegant view for this bridge. i know he had help from his brother they got it done and we have a bridge we can walk
leaves behind. >> reporter: the so-called supercop is back in new york. the mayor elect named william braton the job he had under giuliani. >> this is a beacon of light for the rest of world. >> reporter: his record of cleaning up crime was what attracted the oakland officials, paying him $250,000 to tell them how to tackle crime here. a year-long contract job that ended a month ago. >> i think what bill did was that he came in and he watched how we were implementing different things, from time to time, our crime analysis. even though you can do the form of it, do you do the heart of it, try to predict where the crime will happen? having someone who is the nation's expert on him was really important, i think. >> reporter: a major strategy he pushed was breaking down the city into five districts, with police commanders tasked with building relationships and being responsible for the crimes in their communities. the mayor believes the strategy has worked to reduce the violence. >> reporter: in fact the mayor credits his ideas as well as other changes in the police department for the 25%
to have the mandate of a popular election as the only appointed president, almost a president with an asterisk next to his name. >> she may have supported his bid for the white house but when they first met she didn't know she was getting a politician. is that true? >> that's what she says. it's hard for me to believe she was totally naive. jerry ford was the big man on campus. the local hero from high school days playing football. it's not terribly surprising he should decide to go into public life. but there is no doubt she was surprised. they were married in october 1948. >> and on twitter did the ford's schedule their wedding for october 15 after the republican congressional primary and why? >> the simple answer is yes. have you to know west michigan to appreciate. west michigan more than now was a very culturally conservative place. a place where the dutch reform church held sway. a ford who was certainly conservative ff nevertheless was running against an entrenched republican encome bent who opposed the mar alcohol plan. he was one of those returning veterans who had s
couple elections. that's all we have to do. but there might be a smaller break out of republicans who say, you know what? i've got a responsibility to my constituents at home to make this thing better. it's going to be here. it's going to be here as long as we live. it'll be here forever, perhaps. but i'm going to make it better. there's a couple tweaks i know about. maybe i heard it from jack cason or someone i look more positively toward on the republican side. >> you're hearing some people speak in those terms, chris. let's face it. it's still a fact that obama and obama care are the two words that really unify republicans across their factional lines and they're not going to give up on it very quickly. and the minute they come up with a positive suggestion of which there are several floating around paul ryan and others have had a free market oriented alternatives. but they are not popular. even among republicans. they can't build a consensus around them. we debated proposals during the last presidential election, you'll remember. no voucherizing medicare, selling insurance across stat
for the humanities fellowships among others. last year she was elected a fellow of the american academy of arts and sciences. a former director of the leon leavy center for buying agraph in new york. she teaches in the msa programs of the new school glover columbia university school of the arts and has taught sarah lawrence college and union college in new yorkie she was washington irving professor of modern literary. please welcome brenda wineapple and nathaniel philbrick. [applause] >> on my way over here, nathaniel and i talked about how both of these subjects are obviously the most -- among the most notable eras of american history. how could we characterize a comparative deal between your book and brenda's when it comes to intensity, and relevance, where both in the revolution and the civil war. there wasn't very much of a clear future in either era. >> i was thinking about this question when i heard about the great opportunity to be paired with brenda, and my bunker hill begins actually -- begins and ends with john quincy adams. it begins with him at seven years old, standing on a hill wi
.50 an hour by 2016. >>> his first full day as a cant for re-election, mayor gray battled with reporters. he wanted to talk about economic success. tom sherwood reports gray was pressed on his record and 2010 campaign that remains under criminal investigation. tom? >> gray was there to talk about his success as mayor. the event got off on a bad foot before it started. arriving for a news conference on economic development, the security staff blocked reporters from his elevator. >> that's it. that's it. >> why can't reride up, mr. mayor? >> it was nonfunctional. >> reporter: the mayor spoke more than an hour. >> a vital, breathing, growing city, making a city safer. >> reporter: he bris led when asked if his successes were from the former mayor. >> you are wrong, okay? you are plain wrong. >> reporter: they came over to challenge the reporter, aaron wiener. >> that's what they did. a lot of ground breaking with little in the pipeline. there's no funding for it. >> reporter: when gray said he was running on his record, the federal criminal probe into his 2010 campaign. >> have you cooperated?
tactics or that he's an illegal alien who shouldn't have been elected in the first place and should be deported to east africa or somewhere more distant. we have a wild and wooly right wing out there that cares nothing about facts, only the need to strike a blow for benghazi, birtherism or bingo. yesterday the republican led house judiciary committee held a hearing called the president's constitutional duty to faithfully execute the laws. dana milbank is with us right now. this was an impeachment hearing. time and again, the red hots on the far right blew the bugle for driving the president from office. >> what can you do. you got to go up there and you impeach him or you go up there and you just cut funds off. you shut everything down. >> if a president is ignoring entire categories of the law, whether it be immigration, marijuana, mandatory minimum, the aca, what is the remedy for the legislative branch. >> the next recourse, the word that we don't like to say. >> we've also talked about the i word, impeachment, which i don't think would get past the senate in the current climate.
of people elected. >> i think john boehner who i know and like would retract those comments. i hope he would. i'll put in a different perspective. they are right where they were a few months back. democrats wanting more revenue, republicans wanting some cuts in entitlements. now, i'm not that bright and neither is my 3-year-old dog. it suggests to me the only way we're going to get a deal is if some people are willing to give. there is common ground. the president is willing to recalculate benefits under social security, formula for those calculations early in the year. paul ryan agrees with that. the president also said he's willing to look at medicare premiums for those that earn more. ryan says he agrees to that. i don't understand why adults can't come into the room -- this is not placing -- i think republicans are at blame but at some level this impasses, we have a subsenate, we all have to give a little bit here. if not the sequestration cuts will take effect in january. as much as some people don't like them, the sky didn't fall in when they happened at the beginning of this year. i d
the c.a.r. later in the program. the prime minister of thailand called for new elections today, in the face of protests against her rule. the opposition has accused her of corruption, insisting again she must go. john sparks of "independent television news" reports from bangkok. >> reporter: protest leaders called it the day of reckoning. a time to do-or-die. when their call was answered on the streets of bangkok by more than 150,000 people. and each one seemed determined to topple the thai government. >> we've got to get them out. we're playing our last card. >> reporter: they've been at it for weeks. a rolling protest against the government of prime minister yingluck shinawatra. with demonstrators converging on government headquarters this morning, the thai prime minister made a surprise announcement. she disolved the government. >> miss yingluck who sounded shaken said let the people decide who governs next. back on the streets, the prime minister's big declaration had little impact. many here don't want elections. they want something completely different. the leader of thes
can't or you're a bully. i think the best debate i ever had in my four elections is against a woman and i did so well at the end that i walked out going -- she was tough. she was attacking me on every single issue. it got personal. very angry. i sort of -- i brushed it off. but it was so bad that i was walking out and they were booing her and i walked out. i felt sorry for her. right? even though she had been attacking he in whole time boy that didn't go well. the next day in the newspaper the screaming headlines were that, you know, i was a bully and it was terrible. i never raised my voice because it just went so bad for tonally it was a surprising and jarring thing. the next day when you run a campaign against a woman, especially if you're a 6'4" man you got to take extra, extra care. >> right. but there's also a ton of studies and information and evidence that shows women are negatively portrayed when they express their views firmly. i have some sympathy with how men have to address women and you can't retaliate in a way you would against a guy but women are always being seen --
that were criticizing him. nelson mandela, i was on election observer in 1994, and mandela was being attacked by black nationalists that felt he sold out and de klerk by africaners that felt he sold out. they had to fight inside their own base to have this reconciliation which makes them even greater figures. how do you deal with having to balance those that are with you, think you're too soft, those that think you're too hard and find a way to go down the middle. that's where greatness is achieved. >> every revolutionary man or woman has that great challenge. >> absolutely. >> wow. >> let's look back to the 1961 when the 42-year-old activist gave his first televised interview. >> i went to see the man who organized this, a 42-year-old african lawyer nelson mandela the most dynamic man in south africa today. the police were hunting for him at the time but african nationalists arranged for me to meet him at his hide out. this is mandela's first television interview. i asked him what it was that the african really wanted. >> the africans require one franchise of one-man/one-vote. >> do
broadly in the 2014 midterm elections and in the 2016 presidential election and therefore, we see president obama going back to his political roots in trying to raise this as an issue for the nation to debate and consider. ? clarence, how do you see this playing into 2014. >> i thought it was an aspirational speech meaning one who sets goals to aspire to without giving you formula for getting there. it was an important pep talk for his base. he spoke at a liberal think tank and he's got a lot of people as he mentioned who, word of the white house came through there, the center for american progress and he's speaking to folks across the country especially in the wake of the whole meltdown of the obama care website. this gives him more of a positive message to give to democrats, and to a working class people certainly who have been suffering on the losing end of a rising income and equality. >> you pointed out, susan, that this is not unique to his campaign either for barack obama or period. it's been used before this income inequality theme. john edward his the two americas. most r
and people are still not buying it. >> the president ran the election. million people showed up on the website yesterday. guess what, 380,000 showed up before noon today. >> republicans insist it is just the tip of the iceberg. >> this bill is fundamentally flawed. it is causing people to lose the doctor of their choice, causing them to lose their health plan. and if that is not enough they're having to pay much higher prices at the same time. >> noting there is not a lot of air cover for the president from congressional democrats who did not have a lot of news conferences to back him up. perhaps nervous politically about touting this health care law, but a white house official just told me it is the first day of a 3-week campaign and they're confident the president will have the support in the end. lou: thank you very much. despite the president's defiance, millions of americans face a fast approaching deadline to avoid a gap in health care coverage. over 5 million individual plans have already been canceled. most with policies that expire at the end of the month and with an ob
after declaring independence from yugoslavia in 1992. the documents depict a newly elected president eager to address the intensifying conflict which showed no signs of resolution. in 1995, the clinton administration's international leadership led to the dayton accord which ended fighting in the region. the second story is one of intelligence support. in june 1992, the cia created the dci balkan task force to coordinate intelligence support to the policymakers on the rapidly growing balkan conflict. the clinton administration informed by the balkan task force charted a strategic policy melding humanitarian aid, economic sanctions, force and diplomacy. but the path to peace as these documents will make clear was treacherous and the administration relied on accurate intelligence to make difficult choices. the last story is the uniqueness of the documents themselves. this collection represents only a portion of the documents concerning the bosnian war. it is the youngest collection ever released in the 20 year existence of the cia's historical review program. now, before it gives our fi
" is why bill de blasio was elected. the tale of two cities as he put it. a lot of it, steve you have some charts here -- goes to affordable housing. so many elements to this story. it's not a new york city story it's a national story. mika said one in five american children live in poverty. >> it's a national story. what you have are a number of things that come together to create it. you had this terrible recession. you have the rising income equality which is fine for wealthy people to get wealthier but the people at the bottom have gotten poorer. you have reduction in food stamps. the average food stamp income has gone from $33 to $25 as part of this. you got a discussion about the minimum wage. >> you can't live on it. >> there's a whole bunch of things that come together in a perfect storm for people at the bottom and so they feel very picked upon and i think rightly so. >> joe, you would agree you got to make work pay in order to get people network. asking people to work for something they can't afford to support their family on that's not really how welfare reform works. >> i agree
that the horror stories will basically lead them to next year's election. i don't think it is going to last for 50 weeks, but this is what they put all of their emphasis on, and we're just going to hear more and more of them. but as you say, they sort of get further and further from any reality. >> the crucial test on the political consequences are whether they do make that jump. when you talk about the planned cancellation stories, which when you scratch the surface of a lot of them were way less than they appeared. we're talking about people who qualified for subsidies, and were not reported for qualifying for subsidies, those really did have an impact. but i think the mainstream media that has been burned have gotten more skeptical. >> the cancellation stories, for a week there they were everywhere. and i think a vast majority of americans thought millions of people just lost their health insurance. they got a cancellation notice inviting them to join another plan that may cost them less. so that was a main stream media problem, and hopefully they got burned so they will sort of leave these oth
into the election. the poll shows brown leads g.o.p. with 52 percent of support from california voters. the next closest candidate is former lt. governor with 11 percent. the governor has not officially announced whether he plans on running for re-election but he is widely expected to run. >> very cold out there this morning. lisa? >> good morning, we have dropped to 19 degrees in napa with san francisco at 42 and freeze warning through tomorrow with san francisco milder but pacifica is in the low 30's and freezing temperatures from hair, mountain view, san carlos and below freezing in san jose and fremont. san ramon, livermore, 25 and 28. today, the coldest morning by far all across the bay area and we will see temperatures stay in the 30's with morning lows tomorrow a few degrees warmer but, city, in the 20's inland and near freezing around the bay and saturday morning we will have a winter mention with higher elevation snow an the bay and the weekend, not were of a warm-up. >> we have a brand new problem northbound 280 at ray street you will find on the shoulder, involving a big rig and a veh
brown has not announced whether he will seek re- election, he was preferred in the poll over three republican candidates. >>> fast-food workers in the bay area are getting ready to protest low wages. [chanting] >> about 100 mcdonald's workers in new york city staged a noisy protest this morning. the workers are asking for $15 an hour. and the right to form a union without retaliation. right now, many fast food workers earn minimum wage which varies from state to state from about $5 to $9 and hour depending upon the state. >>> well, temperatures finally beginning to recover a little bit after the very cold start this morning. we have another round of very cold temperatures once again. freeze warnings to talk about first thing tomorrow morning. you can see our live camera looking out over toward the bay bridge. we're in the clear with the high clouds out to the to the north and west. the satellite shows ez clear skies. no storms just yet but we have the cold air mass pushing into the region moving in from the north. with that we're gonna hold onto the cold weather pattern into your f
became a nobel peace prize recipient and fruition of political dream was elected president in the country first free election. tonight millions are mourning nelson mandela all around the world. symbol of freedom and strength of human spirit. in south africa and beyond. this is abc news, washington. >> mandela will receive a state funeral. arrangement not yet announced but president obama is expected to fly to south africa to attend. >> well mandela impact on his country can not be overstated nor can the legacy he leaves behind for the rest of the world including here in the bay area. lee ann is in berkeley. >>reporter: june 1990 nelson mandela was released from prison few months earlier. 58,000 people packed the oakland coliseum to see and hear him. mandela delivered a message of thanks and hope. >> it is you that people of oakland, the people of the bay area who have given me and my delegation hope to continue the struggle. >>reporter: state senator hancock was on stage with mandela that day. back then she was the mayor of berkeley and the city council had already voted to sanct
. >> there is no doubt the system continues to be enher rently flawed and corrupt. elected politicians receiving company contribution, sitting across the table negotiating for higher pension benefits. that's just an inherent conflict that ought to be avoided. it hasn't been for generations in every state. >> the league is making promises they can't keep. >> we are negotiating with ourselves. the job with the union is to get as much. the george bush on the other side as a politician is to do the best in the city. >> the new york commuter line where four people were killed in a train wreck over the weekend should be getting back to normal. union representatives, the train's eng 94, william rockefeller says he nodded off while driving. when he came to, he shut down the throttle and tried an emergency braking tech neevenlth the drowsy feeling we sometimes get staring at divider lines when driving. nbc's tom costello has more. >> a train wreck, five cars on its side. >> reporter: as they released recordings of the transmission, engineer william rockefeller was described by his union as distraught. after year
who are elected from our states to represent the people who have a right to be heard. 77 times this majority leader has cut off amendments in a body whose whole purpose is to amend, debate, and vote. i call it a gag rule. with the majority cutting off the right of american voices to be heard on the senate floor. 114 times he's filed a motion to cut off debate on the same day he's introduced a bill, and he calls that a filibuster. i call it a gag rule. he's bypassed senate committees in an unprecedented way. 76 times in the last six years. he set himself up as the king of the senate. may i offer an amendment on iran, a senator might ask? no. may i offer an amendment on egypt? no. how about an amendment on obamacare? what about a bill on the national labor relations board? no. can we work on appropriations bills? no. only one person deciding what happens here when in fact the history of the senate has been a place of virtually unlimited debate on virtually any amendment. that's been the history of the united states senate. it's different than the house of representatives. it has
revolution led to a rerun of suspect elections and mr. yanukovych's ouster from office. he seems determined not to repeat that experience. the question is whether he has overplayed his hand by giving into russian demands. the new generation of protesters empowered by the memories and failed promises of the orange revolution and the organizational tool of the internet, are equally determined not to give in. for them, this battle is about the soul of their nation. they were outraged by the government's 11th hour u-turn against an agreement with the e.u. which would have been an essential milestone towards full e.u. membership. the toxic situation here was further enflamed by the heavy and brutal hand of the police. the riot police used teargas, baton charges and stun grenades. the protesters responded with rocks. the result: dozens of injured on both sides and a foretaste of things to come in a crisis with no elegant or obvious solution. >> woodruff: for more on the protests and what it all means, i'm joined by former u.s. ambassador to the ukraine steven pifer, now a director and senior fell
, millennials were the outliers, one of two significant groups that helped elect the president and re-elect him in 2012. up until the last year or so, they've been outliars. over the course of our last two surveys they've actually fallen quite neatly with the rest of america, looking a lot like their older brothers and sisters. we've seen that frankly that the president's approval rating has decreased by about 11 points across-the-board over the last year. significantly 15 points among women, 9 points among men. even among-- approval under 50%. >> and what do they say about the congress which we know is also seeing its approval ratings drop? >> unfortunately, those numbers are bad and getting worse. democrats in congress continue to fall and republicans in congress only 19% of all,-- of young americans under the age of 230 believe they're doing a good job or approve of the job that they're doing in washington d.c. so as bad of a day this might be for the president and those who care about the affordable care act, it's not any better for republicans in congress. >> woodruff: john, finally, i wan
and parliamentary elections. this government should resign. >> pictures have emerged from sunday night that show the police were at times brutal in their treatment of protest ors and journalists. anton is a photographer, one of dozens who were beaten by riot police. he pleaded to them to stop. this is what is left of his camera. but the police were also on the receiving end. officials say 35 were hurt by protesters, some in hospital. away from city hall there are no protests, just the grim life of wirpt. tatiana is very much in favor of political change. >> we were on our knees for a long time. now it's time to wake up. i'm grateful for the protestors, i want my children and grandchildren to have better lives. >> they put guards on the barricades. they control the center of kiev. but they will have to convince the rest of the country to follow them. >> that's al jazeera's barnaby phillips. >>> just returned from protest in kiev last week, now with us in chicago. appreciate both of you being with us. again i'll talk with you for a moment, ask you, you were at the protest, what did you see? pavlo?
one that somehow care for the people. >> john cavanagh wrote the election privatizing prison health care. we asked whether he thought it would put prisoners in gaol. >> people die in gaol. i receive emails and letter from prisoners and families, with you call the prison people up, and they usually have an explanation for it. i spoke to a woman yes.er day. she gave birth, had a c sections, the wound opened up and the doctor took sugar and poured it inside the wheel. does that sound like adequate health care? >> that doesn't sound like a true allegation, it sounds ridiculous. prisoners have 24/7 to think up allegations and right evidence. i'm not saying some you don't take with a grain of salt or a grain of the sugar. >> how can the woman that gave birth, how can she prove that allegation. she's in prison. who will listen to her? >> there's no shortage of people who would file a lawsuit. a class action lawsuit is the biggest scam to the public. i think most people who get into them wind up with nothing and the lawyers walk away with their drunks full of cash. >> we are planning a wedd
democratically elected leader. >> the faithful for the republic of south africa. to ae in a small village local chief, mandela was one of 13 children and a first member of his family to attend school. in the 1940's, he began opposing the white minority's i'll see of apartheid, laws that segregated and made colored south africans second -- second-class citizens. at first, mandela was inspired by gandhi's approach of nonviolent resistance. as white south africa became more aggressive, so did he. as the head of the armed wing of the national international he was arrested and tried in 1962. he was then 27 years in jail and was never forgotten. eventually, international and internal pressure led to announcing it would be dismantled and he would walk free. rather than seek recognition, nelson mandela reached out to his former pressures -- oppressors. he shared the nobel peace prize. >> we want them to feel safe. the will appreciate in death and what they have made. >> he voted for the first time with millions of this fellow black and. statesman, an international icon. despite struggles -- >> free of
. she did however say i have not yet announced my re-election plans and i'm focused on my priorities as mayor. >> oakland is looking for competent strong leadership. i'm very excited about campaigning. >> reporter: it going to be an interesting year. the question is, of course, how many other people will jump in this race? oakland is still a prize the city new states and somebody else could join us. >> oakland uses rank choice voting. how do you think that's going to come into play? >> reporter: that's the big question. san francisco uses it, too. it gives voters a choice of three candidates out of the gate and then you stack up. those votes tran fer to the other two: quan got in by saying anybody but perata but in this race the rumblings are will be but kiwanis race. >>> also tonight stay lawmakers are defending a decision to accept pay raises starting today they are getting a pay raise of more than 5%. that pushes their base pay up to $95,000. it's their first pay raise in more than 6 years after several years of cutbacks. but not all lawmakers are getting pay raises. a dozen refu
announcing his re-election bid, d.c. mayor gray touted the economic successes since he became mayor. during the news conference, things got heated. the mayor got angry when reportered questioned him about his record and the 2010 mayoral run that is under investigation. we'll have more in a live report at 5:00. >>> in northern virginia right now, water main breaks are starting to tear up the roads, especially in parts of arlington. south arlington mill drive was closed between south taylor and south randolph street. there was a second main break on south monroe street hours later. the first was reported around 4:00 this morning. residents woke up with no water. an elementary school was closed because of the breaks. >>> at this hour, there are still more questions than answers in sunday's deadly train derailment that killed four people in new york. andrew cuomo said he wants to know why the train was going three times the speed limit. the state is now requiring all metro transit employees to take part in safety briefings. we'll have the search to find out if mechanical or human error led to i
elections and we're going to affect the public mind. >> rose: i know we will overcome it, but i don't know what the timeline on that is. we have these phases in america where crazy things happen economically and politically. and what's going on in washington now will not be sustained. i don't know when it ends. we all pray it ends some time soon, maybe the next five or ten years. i happen -- i have great hope that maybe the right president could bring them together. i don't know what's going to end it but it will end and the united states will be fine in this regard. >> rose: so we started talking about george soros and he's on the left and you're somewhere on the right but on social issue are in the center. what does george say about your ideas? >> i haven't talked to him about it. >> rose: why not? >> haven't gotten around to it. both his sons came to me and they really like it. >> rose: come on. you're smarter than this. why haven't you talked to him about it? >> i probably will in the next -- this is pretty new for me, charlie. i didn't even know i was going to do this. it will probabl
with tremendous hope when nelson mandela was elected. and i think you've seen quite a bit of that hope whittled away. it's one of the most unequaled country in the world. crime remains an indem i believe problem. the education system is riddled with problems. and you also see that there is an increasing public corruption. so the current president has been involved in a huge scandal involving his private home. so people look to nelson mandela and think theres with a leader. there was someone with real integrity. so i think that this is a moment for people to look back and reflect on where they've come from and how to get back on the right path. >> woodruff: and also by definition losing what i think you call the moral center for the country. >> well, i think for many people nelson pan della does represent a kind of moral center. and a choice to turn away from violence, to turn away from strife. and to turn away from racial divisions. and instead of standing in judgement of one another, to reconcile and to admit that we did terrible things to each other. but now we're ready to move on. and i thin
a new high. and it comes at a good time as he is looking to get re-elected next year. the field poll released today finds that nearly six of 10 registered voters approve of his performance, up seven points since a similar survey in july. the poll also favors him over three potential republican rivals. brown was the choice of 52 percent of those surveyed. governor brown has not said if he will seek a fourth term. >> big software companies are betting the next big trend in personal computers will be of the wearable kind. microsoft research says it's started developing a smart bra. and it seems the device could really help women who are -- for instance -- on diets. researchers say the smart- bra would be embedded with physiological sensors. the sensors will monitor heart activity to keep track of emotions and to help combat overeating. at this point, the product is not slated to actually go on the market. >> there are re have these things such you can wear on your wrist. why did it want to wear them in our bras. >> coming of bay area residents are just giving away their phones. the san
-sisi of egypt. he is responsible for the first democratically elected government of egypt. he got nearly 500,000 voters. turkey's prime minister came in second. si pop singer miley cyrus came in third. the offical person a year will be selected by times editors and announced on wednesday. and >> that is it for this morning. we hope you will join us back here on monday. here is a picture of how the world is are remembering and nelson mandela. >> announcer: today on an all-new "dr. phil." >> kayla phillips says she was stopped after buying a handbag. >> dr. phil: you feel like this was racial profiling. >> absolutely. >> the cop reached for his gun. >> i said we're actors, not criminals. >> i said are you doing this because we're black? a couple seconds later, we were handcuffed. >> dr. phil: you stop me, handcuff me, you better have a good reason. >> dr. phil: let's do it. >> have a good show, everybody. here we go. >> dr. phil: i hate to see people suffering. you've hurt long enough. >> stand by, dr. phil. >> dr. phil: i'm going to get you the help you need. this is going to be a changing da
protesters rallied outside a re-election event for the district attorney. she says the investigation will be based on justice, not politics. >>> hayward police say a 16- year-old boy shot and killed last month in a hayward park died trying to help a young girl. police say christopher prisinos stepped in to defend a teenaged girl being threatened by two suspected gang members. both of those suspects are now charged with murder. prisinos was a father of a 6- month-old son. his family said he planned to become a paramedic and had just received his cpr certify dation. >>> two elite runners from kenya will participate in a first u.s. marathon this sunday there's to the kindness of a complete stranger. $9,000 was raised online to fly the men two san francisco through a new organization he started. he said he was inspired by the elite runners who come from a small town with running water or electricity. they will be running the marathon in sacramento. first they will be treated to a shopping spree in san francisco later today. >> the people are really friendly. people are really welcoming.
closest to who at one point was a senator go from senator to being elected president, and you were still there when he got the second term which you call legacy. first term is try to get done, second term is to build your legacy. drop that period, what type of movement, what have you seen as far as faith in barack obama? >> his faith has deepened. it is a great question. he has said that himself. there's something about a constant stream of trials and different things you have to overcome that slows you down and gives you a sense of perspective. president obama is the last person in the room to panic, the first person to say hold on, let's put a strategy together and we will get through this and that is a prospective god would have all of us, so easy to look at the challenges in front of us and think they are going to be the end of the world and yet we serve a god who has parted seas and raise people from the dead and done all sorts of things and then moved on to yet another challenge and that is the perspective he wants all of us to have. i have seen the president have a deepening faith
. but they are not in a position to do that because they've got nervous democrats up for re-election. they had to fix this. they had to come up with something they said was a fix. december 1st. but puts them in the unenviable position of, again, saying something that probably from what i read -- i mean, if you can go in and log in and maybe get on there. but if you -- the back end seems like it's more important than the front end. and if you don't have the back end done, how do any of these companies write insurance? signing up for it is one thing, actually getting it is another, right? >> that point you're making is absolutely true. i'll reflect in history back to 2006 when i had the responsibility of implementing the medicare part d program. we reached -- we had some substantial technical problems in the first eight weeks of the system. there was a stretch of about 13 days where i was in 20 states and that 13-day period. and my message was basically breathe through your nose because we're trying to get this fixed and we're going to get this fixed. and i was buying time. i was doing what i thought was th
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